Reflections from the Past

Those who refer to and enjoy memories from their long lost youth are often disparaged for “living in the past.” The accusation is without merit.

First off, even if a person wanted to live in the past it would not be possible. That life is long gone as are all the things needed to live in that way again. For example, those of us who were born decades ago may wish that we could once again live life without the Internet and social media. Obviously, that is not going to happen for many reasons.

Second, those who listen to reflections of past personal experience and history are likely to learn a thing or two that could help them in living their own lives. When grandchildren listen to the life reflections of a grandparent they may hear personal accounts of the horrors of war.  Those children may come to understand that making war is not a good option.

Third and most important of all, personal reflections help us to understand our own lives. Knowing where we started helps us to understand where we are now and the path we traveled to get there.  

Frankly, I don’t quite understand those who profess having little recall or interest in their own past. Even if that past life had been more bad than good, revisiting it occasionally is instructive.

Incidentally, this was written as I listened to music of the fifties on Sirius/XM.

About authorbillramsey

During his forty-year professional career, Bill Ramsey wrote magazine articles and business newsletters. Now retired in the mountains of western North Carolina, he writes a blog and has published four books. Bill's 2015 collection of concise, real-life essays is titled "What Do YOU Think?" He has also written "Me Now - Who Next? (The Inspiring Story of a Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery)" and "Now That I Think About It. Bill's books and are available from Amazon.com and on all e-readers. See www.authorbillramsey.com. Follow Bill on Facebook at www.facebook.com/billramseyauthor/
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